Looking for books on advance engine theory

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Bobby Beyer
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Looking for books on advance engine theory

Postby Bobby Beyer » Thu Dec 06, 2012 3:18 pm

As the title says I'm looking for books on advanced engine theory.

What's spurring this question, is that over the past few months, I've been designing a header for my car using simulation software, while there is absolutely nothing wrong with using software, I just want to gain a better understanding on certain act and behave the way they do. I have a basic understanding, but I guess I don't quite grasp certain phenomena and theories, and why they happen.

I've read the book by Philip Smith, as well as a couple of old engineering books from the mini library at my office, as well as some FSAE articles, but I'm from what I've found certain information appears to be contradictory or out of date. From what I've read I'm having a hard time know which information is correct and which information is not. The theories behind everything make sense to me, but I don't know if they truly are.
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Michael Sullivan
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Re: Looking for books on advance engine theory

Postby Michael Sullivan » Thu Dec 06, 2012 4:19 pm

Some good tech here...

http://www.headersbyed.com/
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Bobby Beyer
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Re: Looking for books on advance engine theory

Postby Bobby Beyer » Thu Dec 06, 2012 5:56 pm

I've read his information but am looking for something a little more "in depth". He doesn't really discuss the Heimholtz resonance, or passive EGR, or the connection from intake to exhaust flow and how each system works with each other. I'm really looking at something that dives into the physics behind these theories.
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Steven Snyder
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Re: Looking for books on advance engine theory

Postby Steven Snyder » Fri Dec 07, 2012 12:24 am

The Bosch Automotive Handbook is relatively easy to find and has some of what you're looking for. It doesn't focus on engines though; it's more of a general reference for modern automotive systems. Very handy reference though.

What you really want is Introduction to Internal Combustion Engines by Richard Stone. I don't have any direct experience with it but I've heard good things. The chapter on induction and exhaust processes should teach enough for you to understand how to implement "passive" EGR with a VVT engine (modern "passive" EGR just utilizes variable cam timing to increase valve overlap when EGR is needed). The book also explains acoustic tuning of manifolds. Here's the table of contents.

Hope that helps!
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Bobby Beyer
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Re: Looking for books on advance engine theory

Postby Bobby Beyer » Fri Dec 07, 2012 12:08 pm

Thanks for the advice, it gives me some good reading options for the next few weeks :D

The only reason I brought up passive EGR is because almost nothing I've found even discusses how you would design a system that has gas flowing both ways.
"Promise mediocrity. Deliver just slightly better." - Jarrett Bellini


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